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live monday looking at first lady rosalin carter. >> the cia and presidential clinton library released more than 300 newly classified documents on intelligence and presidential policymaking in the bos kneian war. a look at the decisions made in the 1990s including commenteds from former president clinton, former secretary of state albright, and retired general wesley clark. >> good afternoon, everybody, and welcome to the clinton presidential center. i'm stephanie street, executive directser of the clinton foundation. thank you for attending this historic conference. this event is a first in several respects. it is the first time a president has participated in a declassification event in a presidential library and first time a presidential library opened a large collection of documents who had the automatic declassification date. it is most appropriate we are here today at the clinton center because the work in the classification area that has taken place over the last 18 years is a direct result of executive order 12958 signed by president clinton in april of 1995. today, the cia and
. as this change, because president clinton decided that he was going to do something about it and he got the system moving. >> let me pick up on that. we are here in this clinton library and i want to bring this back to president clinton. there are more than 40 patients between the situation room and the oval office. rarely do national security advisers get fired when things go wrong but the president could get thrown out of office and i can assure you, the appetite for american boots on the ground in 1995 than there is in 2013. we have gone through somalia, black hawk down, we didn't have a great experience in haiti, no appetite for putting 25,000 troops into bosnia and even in the context of peace agreements most people couldn't tell you where bosnia was on the map. inevitably the peace agreement would be shaky and it was an extraordinarily courageous decision i think. we would not have had peace. that was the centerpiece of the end game because once we said we will be there to enforce the peace, that was the key decision. then there was confidence that a peace agreement actually could
jobs and the economy. former secretaries of state madeleine albright and hillary clinton come a remembering south african president nelson mandela. and a white house briefing with secretary jay carney. >> the book affairs events from washington, putting you in the room at congressional hearings, white house event, briefings, and conferences. and complete gavel-to-gavel coverage of the u.s. house. we are c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. now you can watch us in hd. >> republican senator rand paul at the detroit economic club. some have considered him as a presidential candidate although he himself has not made any formal announcement. this event is part of the road to the white house 2016 coverage. [applause] cracks good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. on this nice brisk detroit michigan day, it is my honor to introduce dr. rand paul, the junior senator from kentucky. the united states senator elected in 2010 and has certainly made his mark in just a very short time. he has proven to be an outspoken champion for cons
today's politics. ext, former secretary of state hillary clinton receiving the next former secretary of state hillary clinton receiving the lanto foundation. also speakingion madeleine all served as secretary of state under bill clinton. they talked about the recent passing of south african mandela. nelson this is 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thank you. please, thank you. you. your kindto mica for words and good morning. thank you to all of you. i'm thrilled to be here. are here to celebrate those who have dedicated their lives rights movement and we would be remiss if we did not speak as to mica did a little while ago to honor the passing movement'she greatest heros nelson mandela. he was an activist, a prisoner conscious, a statesman and above all a teacher and he taught us that the power of forgiveness is greater than the power of hate and the differences of race and matter less than our shared humanity. his presence on this earth will but his lessons will endure in the hearts of millions. in fact become a event as part o
of chicago. she went from there to serve in president clinton's administration in several roles and then she went back to teaching at harvard and was subsequently named as dean of harvard law school, first female dean of the law school there. in 2009, president obama nominated her for solicitor general of the united states and she served in that office for a year and was then nominated as an associate justice of the supreme court. she took that position in 2010 and filled the vacancy of justice john paul stevens who, after his retirement, was our last lecturer here at the law school. those are the vital statistics. i want to tell you something personal about her and i brought this along so i could read it. this year in "time," she was named as one of their 100 most influential people in the world. i want to read to you what they had to say about our speaker today. "elena kagan the persuader. a lot of people like to talk about the swing court but every supreme court justice has one vote to cast and eight colleagues. what makes a justice particularly influential is the ability to persuade the
to to see secretary clinton. he loved and admired for so many reasons, her intelligence, %Ñnacity and strength and her willingness to step forward and lead. as we leave this gathering today, i hope it is with renewed sense of commitment to follow in the footsteps of two remarkable people, tom lantos and hillary clinton. we can find a way to be little braver, kinder and determined and standing up for the rights of our fellow human beings. in other words a little more like tom and hillary. i believe that we all come into this world with the power and potential to be brave, to be determined to be champions for justice and dignity for all mankind. a little more than two years ago my husband and i welcomed our daughter, tom's seventh grandchild at that time into the world o' a day that was deeply meaningful for us and our entire family. nelly was born on august 4th. nelly came to us on this day with a feisty and fearless personality. i sometimes tremble at the sight of crossing her. but more importantly, she came to us with the legacy of selfless pursuit of social justice. freedom and
with your calls. a statement here from bill clinton. lost one of its most important leaders. - our maura, illinois is next. i actually had a chance to see nelson mandela when i was a student in south africa. , around 1994. he came to the council where i was. he was an ordinary guy. all theking around campuses in south africa. just for the students to have a good [indiscernible] >> thank you for your call. , they raise post their fist upon his release from prison after 27 years. that is from 1990. caller: hello. i want to give my condolences. host: make sure you mute your set. caller: i would like to give my condolences to his family and the people of africa. today was a tragic day. they lost an important man. i really wish in the united states school districts, they would teach more about him. there is a lot of people that they don't know what he has done for the country. they are not up on the things that he has provided for africa. they know that he has passed away. host: we appreciate your call. the last word here. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of pea
, hillary clinton is someone that my union has supported for every single a job that she is either run for or sought. when she ran for senate in york state, we were out there and very supportive. when she ran for president in 2008, we were out there in supportive. i think it is far too early to talk about any of this. the last i heard, she had not even decided whether she was running or not. i think it is too premature. frankly, there's is a lot of work we have to do between now and 2014, 2015. we are spending our time trying to figure out how to reclaim the promise of public education and figure out how quality health care is something that all americans have and getting through the ups and downs of obamacare. i'm glad we fight is working -- the website is working better now. we need to work on affordable college, making sure there is retirement security for all. there is a lot of work to do the between now and 2015, 2016. >> i would like to get your thoughts on what happened in detroit yesterday. i am curious what you heard from your members in michigan about their concerns on their
's, it's a few minutes ago, we will show you those as well. cspanchat.ag is # bill clinton tweets i will never forget my friend madiba, the colloquial casual name for resident mandela, and a look the president has included in that suite. who tweets, a look at the apollo theater, the marquis, honors nelson mandela tonight. here's the front page of "the new york times" -- john mccain from arizona tweets rest in peace, nelson mandela, whose courage and character inspired south africa and the world. let's hear from you. greg from new york city. caller: hello. to seehe privilege nelson mandela at a harvard university -- he was given an honorary degree in 1998, and i was so moved to hear his speech. and i'm -- my heart goes out to his family today. thank you very much. host: we hope to bring you to the 1998 congressional gold medal ceremony honoring nelson mandela. from colorado springs, good evening. caller: good evening to you. i had the privilege of seeing him on his tour in africa when he was released in 1990. and hisrate his life legacy and benchmark and a father figure to the regio
on a ridiculously false premise. remember stories about records that indicated that hillary clinton met surprisingly infrequently with the president showed that with a little digging, cabinet secretaries don't normally get entered into the visitors logs because they come frequently. comesen sebelius frequently and meets frequently with the president. i will refer you to the department for more information and more detail. but she is here a lot. she meets with the president .ith regularity with the exception of public calendars, there are standing meetings for the secretary of defense, state, and the treasury this president has, but he meets secretaries in one on ones and small groups all the time. that thosee calendars may never show a meeting i have with the president. i had to yesterday. that is how it works. >> a final question on nelson mandela. what people will be thinking about, when we consider the life of nelson mandela and the challenges that exist in our own country, what lessons can washington learn? i know you had conversations in the white house and what you think the message we can lea
by first lady michelle as well as george w. bush and hillary clinton. jimmy carter plans to join the group. nelson mandela will be very december 15 following a state funeral in his hometown. >> the wireline world is the central circulatory system of our economy. it is the veins and the arteries that can act what is now the information economy in the u.s.. we are seeing data traffic increase at the rate of 40% per year. it is wireline networks that connect all forms of communications, what are they exhibit -- whether they originate in a wireline or wireless environment. future of the communications industry, with u.s. telecom head walter mccormick. tonight on "the communicators," at 8:00 eastern on c-span2. >> i got upset with the president. the, at my mental health first few meetings. then they never showed up. housewalking in the white and i met this woman, one of the press people. , nobody ever covers my meetings. she said, mrs. carter, mental health is not a sexy issue. legislation and mental health systems act of 1980. it passed through congress one month before jimmy was, as he says,
obama, not for president bush, not for are president clinton, not for any president. and because senator reid, the distinguished majority leader, believed that the district judges were moving too slowly through the senate, we changed the rules this past year. we said that with district judges, once there's a cloture vote -- and remember, no why judge has ever been denied his seat because of a cloture vote. once there's a cloture vote there can only be two hours of debate, one for the minority and one for the majority. so this is a manufactured crisis. that's what was done in order to do what the democrat majority did on november 21, si which is the most stunning development in the history of the united states senate in terms of a rules change and i intend to talk about that tonight and i want through some very specific facts. not speeches, not something made up but facts. and i'm glad that the majority leader moved four district jz just because every one of the other nine might ask mr. majority leader, why did you not move my name? why are you leaving me out? because you could move it on
of the issues that he brought up. issue hazi will be a big for hillary clinton in particular if she runs for president. correctly that there was a -- this was a that the united states and benghazi in articular as the hub of the insurgency against gadhafi at the time, that the united states ut his military resources into to try to help and free from gadhafi. nd for it to turn around so quickly and become a place where the american ambassador and three-point others were killed real problemn as a for the administration and the secretary of state at the time, hillary clinton. that will be something that she'll have to explain probably repeatedly if she tries to take office. r >> bill, again, brings up this issue of legacy. oscar writes in on twitter. effectively talk legacy midway through his presidency. emember ronald reagan, iran-contra. or do we forget already. >> i think it's fair. begins the white house to look at its own legacy. to look i nt starts had and count years and months. is he most remembered for. t's on the white house's mind in particular. i think oscar raises a good point.
government. few people of the that was in the clinton administration for every day, so eight years. [applause] jobs there, including deputy chief of staff to the president. she traveled around the world with him. she was also at treasury. you were traveling with president clinton, you accidentally ran a half marathon. how do you do that? it was during one of the trips. trying to work in exercise was a difficult thing. i decided to go out for a run. i thought i could go out for a run. we were in the countryside in england. it was not marked paths. i ended up going out on some country road and i got lost. i kept looking at my watch because i knew i had to be back for a meeting. >> the motorcade does not wait for you. wait. it does not i kept running and try to flag down cars to figure out where i needed to go. that is the longest i ever run. it was unintentional. it was not an intentional diff dense -- distance, i like shorter runs. i guess we should get down to business. while we are talking, please tweet us at #womenrule. the president is talking at the center for american progress. he is tal
of state madeliene albright and hillary clinton remembering former south african president, nelson mandela. and with the white house with press secretary jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. n this nice brisk detroit, michigan day, it's my honor to introduce dr. rand paul, the junior senator from kentucky. the united states senator. e was elected in 2010 and certainly has made his mark in just a very short time. outspoken to be an champion for constitutional liberties and fiscal responsibility. and a warrior against government overreach. proposals, rst cutting a funding proprose sal nd a plan to balance the federal budget in just five years. he has since introduced similar bills with growing support. n the senate, senator rand served on the foreign relations committee, the health, education, and labor and pension homeland security, and government affairs and the small business committee. a graduate of duke university paolo of medicine, dr. was a practicing ophthalmologist in bowling green, kentucky for 17 years. n 1995, he founded the eye clinic, the organization that prov
w. bush was already on the plane. bill clinton is traveling separately from rio de janeiro where he was attending a global initiative event. also plan to join. george a chevy bush is the only living president who will not .ttend he is no longer able to travel long distances. president obama spoke over the weekend about u.s. relations with israel. it is a form marked by the brookings institute. centersterviewed by the founder. this is about 50 minutes. hello! [applause] >> how are you doing? >> i'm good. hello, everybody. >> one of your staffers said you are in a great mood this afternoon, so -- >> i am. >> we're doubly blessed here. so that's terrific. i'd like to thank you very much for being here today, mr. president. the forum, and i personally, are honored to have you join us in this conversation. and i am personally honored that you insisted that i have this conversation with you, even though i never set foot for any conversation for 10 years. so thank you. i'm very honored. shall we start with iran? >> we should. >> okay, good. [laughter] mr. president, polls indicate that 77%
&a with carol browner, a distinguished fellow, and who also held the same position in the clinton administration. we look forward to those remarks. [applause] good morning, everyone. it is great to be here. thank you for the introduction. also, thank you to my friend carol browner for taking care of the easy things and leaving me with a more complicated work. thank you for your years of service. you do tremendous work at epa. first, i want to congratulate everyone at cap. are 10 yearsyou old. congratulations on the anniversary. it is an incredible achievement to be the place where the best minds come to work and look at opportunities or how we can get together and take action on opportunities to strengthen our country. it is great to be here. i cannot thank all of you enough for the work you are doing on issues like climate change then go to the heart of asking ourselves the question of what kind of a country, and what kind of a world, do we want to leave to our children and grandchildren? these are big issues, and i am glad to be here to talk about them. want to get to the answers and to some d
. >> kimberly? >> do you anticipate that labor will come out early in support of the? >> look, hillary clinton is someone that my union has supported for every single job that she is either run for or sought. when she ran for senate in new york state, we were out there and very supportive. when she ran for president in 2008 we're out there and very supportive. i think it's far too early to talk about any of this. first off, the last i heard, she hasn't even decided whether she's running or not. so i just think it's too premature. there's a lot of work we have to do between now and 2014, 2015. and so we are really spending our time trying to figure how to reclaim the promise of public education, how to make sure that quality health care is something that all americans have, and getting through the ups and downs of obamacare. i'm glad the website is working better now. but about affordable college, making sure that there's retirement security for all as opposed to going in the direction we're going. there's a lot of work to do between '14 and '15 before we get to 16. >> i wanted to get your thou
that hillary clinton had called a reformer. initially, he planned to do that without the congress consent. he didn't think he needed the congress' consent. obviously once there was a lot of political pushback he threw it to the congress and let them decide. but i'm curious from each of y you, what gives the president the authority to order bombing even if he promises to limit the numbetothe number of people thae will kill, what gives him the authority to start bombing a country obviously we consider an act of war what gives him that authority i am curious from each of you. >> while, i think it is a great question because i was a little bit confused when he said no one has accused president obama of being inclined to engage in a war without a declaration. i was in court with members of this committee saying exactly that in the conflict and what disturbed us is the white house came back and said the reason that we don't need a declaration of war is the president defines what it is and he's simply saying this isn't a war. when we talk about the danger this is a danger of a different kind. not on
wife. former president bill clinton is traveling separately from rio de jimmyo. former president carter also plans to attend. president h w bush is the only former president not attending. he is no longer able to travel. upset with the president. they covered my mental health for the first few meetings i had. walking in the and a woman was among the press people. "no one ever covers my meetings." she said "it is just not a sexy issue." tour the country. we passed the mental health systems act of 1980. then as jimmy says, he was on build -- involuntarily retired from the white house. carter, lady rosalynn tonight at 9:00 eastern live on c-span and c-span3. also c-span radio and www.c- span.org. >> remarks now from israeli foreign minister avigdor lieberman. he comments on the current is really palestinian peace talks, the u.s. role in the process. the foreign minister was interviewed friday by washington post reporter david ignatius at a forum hosted by the brookings institution. this is about an hour. [applause] >> so, foreign minister is really your welcome back to washington event. yo
last week at the age of 95. by formerited presidents george w. bush and former president clinton. the prime minister and other members of the house economy where there. this is one hour and a half. >> order. order. the house will wish to know how we proceed today. the questions will be carried over. office will announce consequential changes shortly. this is a special day for special tributes to a special .tatesman, nelson mandela i hope that as many members as possible will be able to contribute. contributions will continue until 10:00 p.m.. the house will also wish to know that there will be an event to commemorate and celebrate the life and achievements of nelson mandela taking place in westminster hall on thursday the 12th of december. >> thank you, mr. speaker. >> nelson mandela was a towering figure in our lifetime. we are here to celebrate his character, his achievements, and his legacy. condolence books have been organized. tos evening we will fly south africa to attend the service and johannesburg. and his royal highness, the prince of wales, will be there for the funera
was about. this was the 1994 agreement clinton reached with kim jong ill. they agreed to mothball the plutonium are wracked need coke reactor -- plutonium reactor that would be built primarily by the united states for let's see, how many years? almost ten years the agreement actually worked. to the extent of the north koreans kept their plutonium reactor mothballed the united states delivered heavy fuel oil, however the u.s. deliveries were often late because congress often would not appropriate the money on time. this was a perpetual problem with the koreans talked about you and the light water reactors when they began construction they were never completed. negotiations continued with the north koreans. madeleine albright, wendy sherman went to north korea in 2000 and i went with them about negotiating a deal on the missiles as well, and the negotiations went well. they went so well that bill clinton had to decide and fli ia coin at the end this presidency whether going to go to north korea or if he was going to try to finalize an arab-israeli peace agreement he and he decided f
, good morning, representative hunter. i remember in the past president clinton was stealing and they are having a problem with their missiles on launch pad getting off the launch pad and their guidance systems. after they made deals with clinton, it appeared that clinton sold them or gave them a guidance system for their icbms and they were able to successfully launched their icbms. with accuracy. it wasn't long after that, just a few months after that their minister of war was threatening the united states over taiwan. also, you got to remember what madeleine albright went to north korea and dealt with the leader at that time over nuclear power plant and supposedly they wanted uranium for the nuclear power plant. they took back uranium and refined it needed in to a nuclear weapon. they also got missile systems in china. i do not trust this administration dealing with iran at all. i think will come out on the losing end of it. >> host: congressman? >> guest: i agree. all things he basically said the same thing. >> host: the american heritage in this paper to a lower the sanc
, -- i whenber in the past president clinton was dealing with china. they had a problem with missiles and their guidance systems. clinton. deals with it appeared that clinton gave them a guidance system for their cbm's and they were able to launch their icbm's. . with accuracy. it was not long after that, a few months after that, the minister of war was threatening the u.s. over taiwan. have got to remember, when madeleine albright went to north with theirealt over nucleart time and was supposedly -- they wanted uranium for a nuclear power plant. they took that uranium and refined and made into a nuclear weapon. they also got missile systems from china. i do not trust this administration dealing with iran at all. i think we will come out on the losing end. host: cumbersome? -- congressman? guest: i agree. all the things i have said, he said the same thing. host: tweeting in. why don't you lower the sanctions first as a jester, you can put them back? -- as a gesture, you can put them back? guest: once you let the monkeys out of the barrel -- you are having the wrong getting into a pack
clinton came along. he brought energy, ideas and a positive outlook. he told us not to stop thinking about tomorrow. it took democrats three the elections to get their groove back. 12 years of painful losses and being out in the wilderness. for them to get past internal differences and find a candidate they could unite behind. i'm hoping it takes us eight years and just two losses. with that, with a positive note i would like to open it up to questions. >> hi. one criticism i've been hearing about why we are seeing so many candidates who can reach across the aisle or can't appeal outside on demographics because of gerrymandering. we have all these ultrasafe crazily drawn districts, and so you don't need to be a more inclusive candidate to win. do you agree with that? if so, keeping the republican party should get behind initiatives to have more nonpartisan league drawn districts, a more saner place to draw congressional districts? >> yes, i agree with that. i think gerrymandering has a lot to do with where we are right now, and that's not just a problem for republicans. it's also a problem
secretary of state hillary clinton talked about nelson mandela. here's some of what she had to say. >> we neat on the day after the oss of a giant among us, someone who, by the power of his example, demonstrated unequivocally how each of us can choose how we will respond to those injustices and grievances, those sorrows and tragedies that afflict all of humankind. nelson mandela will be remembered for many things. he will be certainly remembered or the way he led, his dignity , his extraordinary understanding, not just of how to bring democracy and freedom to his beloved south africa, but how important it was that he first brought freedom to himself. as i spent time with him, starting in 1992 until just in he last year and a half, i was ways struck by the depth of his self-knowledge, of his awareness about how hard it is , of ve a life of integrity service, but to combine within ones self the contradictions that he lived with, a lawyer and a freedom fighter, a prisoner and a leader, a man of . ger and of forgiveness it's so captured the hearts of people not only in his own country, but as
of icons and maybe always will be. president bill clinton, who has such a wonderful with words, said this: every time nelson mandela walks into a room, we all feel a little bigger. we all want to stand up, we all want to cheer, because we'd like to be him, like him on our best day. sadly, nelson mandela won't with walking into our rooms ever again, but we can all still strive to be like him on our best days. for as he said in one of his memorable proverbs, what counters in life is not -- counts in life is not the mere fact that we've lived, it is the difference we've made to the lives of others. >> here, here. >> mr. alistair byrd. >> thank you, mr. speaker. it's a real privilege to to follow the right honorable gentleman. he speaks with an authenticity that few others could have in these circumstances. and it must be the case the vindication of history sits comfortably on his shoulders and all those in the anti-apartheid movement, and he is entitled to his day today, and he's spoken so well of the things that matter so much to him and to so many of us. i remember as a small boy writing -
, and at that ceremony, president bill clinton spoke about betty ford's legacy and her work with helping people with alcohol and drug addiction after she left the white house, and we'll close with that. >> perhaps no first lady in our history with the possible exception of elenor roosevelt touched some -- so many of us in such a personal way. because i lost my mother to breast cancer, betty ford is a heroine to me. because my family was victimized by alcoholism, and i know what it's like to see good, fine people stare into the abyss of their own personal dispair. i will be forever grateful for the betty ford clinic and for the millions of other people whose lives have literally been turned around and often saved, may not have gone to that clinic, but went somewhere because she showed them it was not wrong. for a good person and a strong person to be imperfect and ask for help. you gave us a gift, and we thank you. [applause] ♪ ♪ ♪ >> president obama said the fight with hiv/aids is far from over. he spoke after world aids day, observed each year on december 1st. the president was joined by
clinton had called a reformer. initially he planned to do that without congresses consent. he did not think he needed consent. but obviously once there was a lot of political pushback he threw it to congress and let them decide. i am curious from each of you. what gives the president the authority to order bombing even if he promises to limit the numbers of people that he will kill, what gives him authority to go start bombing a country. we would consider it an act of war. what gives him that authority, i am curious from each of you. >> it is a great question. no one has accused president obama of being inclined to engage in war without a declaration. i was in court with members of this committee saying exactly that. and whatn or conflict disturbed this is the white house came back and said the reason we do not need a declaration of war is because the president alone defines what a war is. he simply is saying this is not a war. and what we talk about the dangers, this is a danger of a different kind. not only a danger separation of powers and dreck violation of the express image o
, the united states, that is not the leadership i expect of my government. the clinton, bush, and obama administration is isolating the united states on this issue. i ask what kind of message is this sending the rest of the world in this lack of he leadership? we ought to sign it. we spend hundreds of millions of dollars removing the land mines and use the leahy funds to help land mine victims around the world. what are we afraid of? we have another law that says we cannot export land mines. let's so the courage. it only take as little bit to go for it and sign the treaty like every ally of ours has done. is that so difficult? let me tell you in conclusion. on november 22nd, remember the great loss this country suffered 50 years ago when kennedy was assassinated. i remember my wife being a young law student and watching the hundreds of thousands of people going down and it was so silent you could hear the drums when the band left and you can hear the lights in the street lights change. and i have been thinking about that a lot in the last few days. we have talked about it and what it fe
government. clinton and george w. bush and the obama of the administration have not joint this issue. i ask what kind of message does this sent the rest of so world with no lack of leadership? we should just sign that we spend hundreds of billions of dollars removing the land mines we use the leahy war victims fund to help victims around the world what are be afraid of? we have another they he law that we cannot export them to show courage only takes a little bit like every one of our allies. is that so difficult? on november 22nd to the great loss this country suffered when kennedy was assassinated. standing right out here at this quarter hundreds of thousands of people on the street yet was so silent you could hear the drones. you could hear the click you could hear the street lights as they changed and the drums of the horses as they came up pennsylvania avenue. i have been thinking about that a lot and what it felt like as the two youngsters still in the year i thought of what kennedy said of the memorable inaugural address to permit the slow undoing the human-rights to which we are com
] [inaudible conversations] >> president obama and former presidents carter, bush and clinton along with other world leaders will be in south africa tomorrow for a memorial service for nelson mandela. that bins at 4 a.m. eastern time. earlier today british prime minister david cameron and members of the british house of commons paid tribute to nelson mandela. here's some of the prime minister's statement. >> mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. he did not see himself as a helpless victim of history, he wrote it. we must never forget the evil of apartheid and its effect on everyday life. separate benches, separate buses, separate schools, even separate pews in church. interracial relationships criminalized, past laws and banning orders, a whole language of segregation that expressed man's inhumanity to man. nelson mandela's struggle was made ever more vital by acts of extreme brewalty on the part of the -- brutality on the part of the south african authorities. his was a journey that spanned six decades through nearly three decades of incarceration through to his negotiations that led t
president clinton laid down the parameters for a final status agreement. they were reaffirmed through the annapolis process during the bush administration, a basic framework will have to address all of the core issues, borders, security, refugees, jerusalem, mutual recognition, and an end of claims. and it will have to establish agreed guidelines for subsequent negotiations that will fill out the details in a full on peace treaty. this is the stuff of our strong diplomacy when it comes to peacemaking. we the united states cannot nor should we make all the hard decisions. only the leaders themselves, the governments themselves can do that. but we can serve as facilitator, the honest broker, and the full partner in the effort to reach agreement. and for all the talk about our disengagement or declining influence in the middle east, just ask yourself about my trips eight trips. in the middle east, the fact is that both parties still look to us to play this role. we are doing so. we are deeply engaged and we will remain so through thick and thin. now i understand there are many who are sk
documentary about hillary clinton that would be viewed on demand on cable counted as a kind of an election message that the law banned in certain blackout periods before elections. that was the original question of citizens united. what you wanted to know is how did that turn into the citizens united case issue about this huge thing that shifted the ground under campaign finance legislation. so he wanted to know how did that work for the court and what with the ups and downs. you know, even when you publish a book like that and have sources like that, you still there from other justice is a, it was a very good book but i think jeff was wrong about this one point. but yes, in the main it's because he's writing a book. >> supreme court reporters failed to be for a long time. lyle denniston i believe has been there for 55 years. amy, do you worry about getting too close to the institution? >> i don't think so. i think especially with lyle. lyle really calls them as he sees them, and he prides himself -- because he prides himself on being independent, not only of his editor and publisher, but
. the president i cover closest bill clinton. but all the recent presidents is degree of personal connection that a president feels and when there's that personal connection, there's the possibility of a relationship that is more like a west wing relationship rather than a cab -- cabinet. tim geithner had a rough time at the start of his term as treasury secretary. but by the end he developed a relationship where i think obama relied on him. and he disrespect a sense that he was the treasury secretary. sort of bold -- you know capital p capital s. he was dealing with tim. my guy who i trust. who i like and respect. and who was in the west wing constantly. probably as much as he was over across the street at the treasury. and other people, i think haven't had that relationship. i'll tell you there's a couple of books i think are going to be interesting when they come out. secretary gates is writing his memoir. what is he going say about the question his relationship with obama? leon panetta what is he going say about thi
nation on earth, the united states. that's not the leadership i expect of my government. the clinton and george w. bush and the obama administration have not joined, have not joined. they have isolated the united states on this issue. i ask what kind of message this sends to the rest of the world in this lack of leadership here we ought to just sign it. we spend hundreds of millions of dollars removing landmines around the world. we use the leahy war victims fund to help landmine victims around the world. what are we afraid of? we have another leahy law says we cannot export landmines? let's show the courage. it only takes a little bit to go for it and sign the treaty, like every one of our allies has done. is that so difficult? now, in conclusion let me tell you, on november 22, remember the great loss this country suffered 50 years ago when president kennedy was assassinated. i remember my wife and i, as a long -- a young law student stand right here on this corner watching them go down. hundreds of thousands industry. you could hear the drums when they left the white house. that f
's not the leadership i expect my government. clinton, the george w. bush in the obama administration have not joined an isolated this issue. i asked what kind of message to this than the rest of the world and this lack of leadership. we had to just sign it. we spend hundreds of millions of dollars are moving landmines around the world. we as the leahy war victims fund to help landmines that comes around the world. what are we afraid of? we have another leahy law that says we can export landmines. it only takes a little bit to go forward and signed a treaty like everyone of our our allies has done. is that so difficult? conclusion, let me tell you another number 22nd, remember the great laws this country suffered 50 years ago when president kennedy was assassinated. as i drove down here, remember my wife and i as a young law student standing right here on this corner, watching hundreds of thousands of people on the street. it was so silent you could hear the drums when the cortÈge left the white house. you could actually hear the click in the street that says they changed and you could hear the hors
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